Ship found in Arctic 168 years after doomed Northwest Passage attempt

The long-lost ship of British polar explorer Sir John Franklin, HMS Terror, has been found in pristine condition at the bottom of an Arctic bay, researchers have said, in a discovery that challenges the accepted history behind one of polar exploration’s deepest mysteries. [...]

On Sunday, a team from the charitable Arctic Research Foundation manoeuvred a small, remotely operated vehicle through an open hatch and into the ship to capture stunning images that give insight into life aboard the vessel close to 170 years ago.

“We have successfully entered the mess hall, worked our way into a few cabins and found the food storage room with plates and one can on the shelves,” Adrian Schimnowski, the foundation’s operations director, told the Guardian by email from the research vessel Martin Bergmann.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/sep/12/hms-terror-wreck-found-arctic-nearly-170-years-northwest-passage-attempt

35 Ellis Island Immigration Photos That Capture American Diversity

As a clerk at Ellis Island from 1892-1925, Augustus Sherman was in a unique position to document countless immigrants as they attempted to gain entrance into the United States. The untrained photographer had an undeniable natural talent: Even with bulky cameras and the time-consuming exposure process they required, Sherman was able to take more than 200 photos — of subjects typically detained for interrogation — that reveal as much about the subjects’ fears as they do the diverse reality of our national heritage:

http://all-that-is-interesting.com/ellis-island-immigration-photos

Renovation of Benjamin Franklin’s home reveals 1200 human bones in his basement

Everyone has secrets, whether they be minor or major.  While some people might discuss their secrets with someone they trust, others will take their secrets to the grave with them. One of those people who took their secret to the grave was Benjamin Franklin.

While alive, Franklin had lived in London’s Craven Street for almost two decades while he was an ambassador for the American colonies.

The little four-story townhouse was renovated and restored in 1998 after the Friends of Benjamin Franklin House had decided to turn the run-down home into a museum.  During that renovation and restoration, the people working on the home discovered something rather disturbing.